Where to eat in Hakuba

By on December 15, 2013

If your family is up for some adventure and prefer to eat out instead of having meals at the hotel,  Hakuba has a number of restaurants serving different local and western dishes.  A fair amount of English is spoken in many of the establishments because of the high presence of foreign visitors.  The key to minimum stress is to plan ahead. Know where to dine and what to expect during your stay to save on traveling time and make the most of your vacation.

Many traditional restaurants do not provide baby chairs and nappy change rooms.  Like Tokyo, a number of them are smoking areas.   It’s a peak ski season in Hakuba so if you are traveling as a big group,  it’s best to reserve even before you leave Tokyo.  Nagano is famous for soba (buckwheat noodles).  There are tons of places where to try them but most menus are in Japanese.  Here are some of the places my family has been to and would recommend to others.

Bamboo Cafe  serves great authentic coffee or hot chocolate and breakfast muffins to start the day right. The cafe that doubles as a bar is also a free-of-charge wi-fi spot so you can stay connected anytime. http://www.bamboohakuba.com/

 

 

Bakery Street Cafe  is within strolling distance to Zenko-ji.  All-day fresh baked bread and delis for the kids are available.  Pass by on the way to the shrine.   The place dishes out European style sandwiches and pastries.  My kids’ favorite is the avocado tuna sandwich.   Open 7:30 am – 7 pm  Tel. 026 232 0269

Cho Cho Bali
Casual Indonesian, Thai and Vietnam dishes is the restaurant’s specialty.  Try the Nasi Goreng plate.  The children will love the Mango lassi.   And the price is surprisingly cheap compared to other restaurants.

Shabu – yo
Nothing beats Shabu shabu in snowy land.   Shabu yo is a family-friendly joint that serves Shabu shabu for lunch or dinner.  The place is fairly huge with a 150 or more seating capacity. It gets very busy at lunch hours.   The price of a decent lunch set complete with rice, pickles, meat and veggies range from 1,258 yen to 2,413 yen (adults) 733 – 1,573 628 yen (grade school students) 628 yen (kids ages 3 and up).  They charge a few yen more for dinner but kids age 3 and below eat for free.   There’s a softdrink bar too.  The place has just undergone complete renovation in November.

 

 

 

Sierra Resort Hakuba
The food at the Sierra Resort hotel where we stayed isn’t 3-star by Michelin standards but are fairly decent compared to what’s on offer at the other hotels and ryokans we have tried previously.  They have baby chairs (on request) and a nice view of a frosty garden from the glass window.  The staff is attentive and eager to please.  Sierra Resort dishes up French-inspired meals with a choice of ala carte or course offering.  http://hakuba.sierra.ne.jp/

 

 

 

Terla Trattoria   

Pizza being the only food that the kids enjoy and less messy to eat, we travel a mile to get our hands on the best we can find.  After many pizza trips to restaurants in Nagano, we almost gave up in the search until we discovered one by chance on the way to an omiyage shop.  Terla Trattoria is a small Italian restaurant owned and managed by a Japanese couple in Shinanomachi that serves the best authentic pizza in Nagano.   Families will not be disappointed with meals here.  The pizza is excellent and baked from a stone oven. The antipasti and pastas are equally delicious.   http://terla-it.com/info.html        Tel  026-255-4553

About Julie Wilson